• Psychological Health and Safety Program Checklist


  • A psychological health and safety program is a definitive plan of action that includes key components designed to prevent work-related psychological injury and illness.

    A checklist of key components is used as an initial gap analysis to navigate through a comprehensive psychological health and safety program by determining what the workplace has in place, whether current state meets organizational need, and to assist in future program planning, development and implementation.

    Once you complete the Psychological Health and Safety Checklist, you will have the option to download an Action Plan of suggestions to meet organizational need for the identified gaps.

    For support to navigate this tool, please contact your PSHSA Health and Safety Consultant.


  • Psychological Health and Safety Program Component

  • *If an item is in place and meets the organization's need, select 'Yes'. If the item is not in place, OR is in place but DOES NOT meet organizational need, select 'No'*

  • 1. Leadership Commitment and Participation


  • 1.1 Senior Leadership is committed to making psychological health and safety an organization priority by allocating resources
  • 1.2 A Psychological Health & Safety (PHS) policy statement is created and communicated to all workplace parties
  • 1.3 Programs supporting PHS in the workplace (including supporting policies WPV / WPH, Emergency planning, code of conduct, respect in the workplace) are identified and in place
  • 1.4 Workplace party roles and responsibilities specific to psychological health and safety are established and communicated
  • 1.5 The role and function of the Joint Health and Safety Committee/Health and Safety Representative as it pertains to psychological health and safety is identified
  • 1.6 A recognition and rewards program is in place that adequately represents industry standards for work being performed

  • 2. Risk Management (Hazard Recognition, Assessment and Control)


  • 2.1 An assessment is completed to identify organizational psychosocial risk factors (13 Psychosocial Factors)
  • 2.2 A job-specific assessment of psychological hazards and associated risk is completed for all jobs within the organization
  • 2.3 Job tasks requiring safe work plans pertaining to psychological hazards are identified, and safe work practices and plans are in place. Safe work plans are communicated to workers
  • 2.4 JHSC monthly inspections include organizational and job-specific psychological factors that may lead to mental injury/illness
  • 2.5 Psychological incidents are included in the employee incident report

  • 3. Training and Education


  • 3.1 Workers are trained on both general hazards and psychological hazards present in their jobs and existing controls to mitigate risk during orientation and on an ongoing basis
  • 3.2 General Mental Health awareness training is provided to workers and supervisors

  • 4. Incident Response


  • 4.1 Incident response process for situations that may affect mental health such as bullying, harassment, violent incidents and exposure to traumatic and chronic mental stress are followed by all workplace parties

  • 5. Worker Supports


  • 5.1 Organization invests in pro-active programs that promote positive mental health and well-being in addition to treatment
  • 5.2 Access to community supports and treatment options are communicated organizationally
  • 5.3 Employer has established an employee and family assistance program (EFAP) service with specific Mental Health supports for workers
  • 5.4 Employer has psychological benefits to meet the needs of the organization’s exposure to psychological hazards

  • 6. Supervisor Response


  • 6.1 Supervisors have the knowledge, skills and training to respond to signs and symptoms of mental illness or injury

  • 7. Peer Support


  • 7.1 Senior leadership is committed to establishing and supporting a peer support program that meets best practices
  • 7.2 Peer supporters with shared workplace experiences are selected and trained
  • 7.3 A Peer Support program is developed and communicated to all workplace parties

  • 8. Post incident response


  • 8.1 Self-screening tools are available and communicated to workers to help identify symptoms of mental injury or illness
  • 8.2 Mental injury / illness exposure screening tools are in place where relevant
  • 8.3 Informal and/or formal incident debriefing processes are in place. Supports may be accessed either internally or external to the organization

  • 9. Stay at work and return to work after injury


  • 9.1 Compensation process for work related and non-work-related mental health injury or illness is developed, implemented, and communicated to all workplace parties
  • 9.2 Training and education is provided such that all workplace parties understand roles and responsibilities pertaining to stay at work and return to work for psychological injury/illness.
  • 9.3 Processes are in place to ensure job demands are in-line with worker capacity (cognitive, psychological, physical), and accommodations are provided where required

  • Thank you for completing the PHS Program Getting Started Checklist. Each item in the sections will identify Suggested Actions when you do not select the in place and meets needs check box.

    For more information and resources, please reach out to your PSHSA Health and Safety Consultant